Google Tag Manager


Measure the Time-to-click in Google Analytics

I’ve previously written a post on how to track clicks on internal links and call to actions. It’s really useful to measure which call to actions are actually clicked. But in some cases we might need more details. Such as knowing how long time it takes for our users to place that click. If users are taking a very long time before clicking a primary call to action, we might be able to help them by tweaking the text or our headers. Read more →

Detect and track iPhone models in Google Analytics

Updated November 20th, 2018. I updated the script to support newer iPhone models up to the iPhone XR and XS Max. Also rewrote the script to make it easier to maintain. Ever since the iPhone 4 came out, I’ve been a bit annoyed with the way mobile (Apple) devices are tracked in Google Analytics. While we get plenty of device information for other brands, Apple has (perhaps intentionally) made it difficult to detect and track iPhone models. Read more →

Track Internal Links with Google Analytics and GTM

Do not use UTM tracking codes on internal links! I just wanted to get that out the way. And if you don’t read anything else in this post, that should be your main takeaway. But if you would like to know how to properly track internal links with Google Analytics, then read on! Why track internal links? Well, first: What are internal links? Internal links are just that. They are links on your website that point to other pages on your website. Read more →

Chrome Extensions for Google Analytics & Google Tag Manager

Implementation and auditing of Google Analytics and Google Tag Manager is essential when working with web analytics. After all, what good are reporting and analytics if you can’t trust your data? Usually, when setting up GTM and Analytics on a website, you’ll find yourself checking source code for the correct dataLayer or using real-time reports to see if data comes in. But Chrome Extensions for Google Analytics and Tag Manager makes it much easier. Read more →

Event Tracking for Mouseover/Hover on Element for X Seconds

A client of mine recently asked me to track ‘mouse interaction’ with an iframe that they embed on several pages. By ‘mouse interaction’, the client basically meant that they would like to track whenever users hovered their mouse cursor over the iframe for a certain amount of time. I’ve previously posted that you can track any mouse or keyboard interactions with Google Analytics. As long as they occur within the browser. Read more →

Track Real Time on Page for Bounces and Exits with GTM

The Time on Page metric is probably one of the most misunderstood metrics in Google Analytics. Google Analytics measures the time on page for each page, but can only do so by measuring the elapsed time between two interactions. The first interaction is the timestamp of the initial pageview, and the second interaction is usually the timestamp for the next pageview (or an event). So for sessions with just one pageview (i. Read more →

Track Device Orientation changes in Google Analytics

Did you know you can detect and track device orientation changes in Google Analytics? That is, if a mobile or tablet user switches between portrait and landscape mode? Well, of course it’s possible (basically anything that happens inside a browser can be detected and tracked in Google Analytics). In a previous post, I wrote about how to detect and track the browser’s viewport (which was made almost obsolete by the new native Browser Size dimension). Read more →

Track Browser Viewport in Google Analytics With GTM

I often setup accurate browser viewport tracking in Google Analytics. Actually, I more or less stopped using the native Screen Resolution dimension in Google Analytics years ago, and I think it has become even less useful after it became possible to view the device category (mobile, tablet or desktop) of a user. The main reason is that the dimension really does not provide a good actionable insight when deciding how to layout and design a web page, and what I would really like to know is to see the user’s actual viewport; i. Read more →

© 2018 Analytical42 / Phillip Studinski